Dilation Exercise 110

Below you’ll find Alan M. Clark’s weekly Dilation Exercise. Please look at the picture, read the caption, above and below the image, and allow your imagination to go to work on it. If the artwork inspires an idea, please use the comment feature to tell us something about it. Need a further explanation? Go to Imagination Workout—The Dilation Exercises.

When I was younger, drinking was the way to relax and have a bit of fun with my friends.

But what’s happened to everyone now, and who’s the guy that keeps staring at me?

—Alan M. Clark
Eugene, Oregon

If you like Alan M. Clark’s artwork, please try his writing in both short fiction and novels.

Artwork: “Taverns of the Dead” copyright © 2003 Alan M. Clark. Cover illustration for Taverns of the Dead edited by Kealan Patrick Burke – Cemetery Dance Publications.

Dilation Exercise 98

Below you’ll find Alan M. Clark’s weekly Dilation Exercise. Please look at the picture, read the caption, above and below the image, and allow your imagination to go to work on it. If the artwork inspires an idea, please use the comment feature to tell us something about it. Need a further explanation? Go to Imagination Workout—The Dilation Exercises.

The boy had no close friends, his parents didn’t understand him, and he loved nothing in the world so much as monster movies; so, he fled reality, entering the television one afternoon during his favorite show, The Horror Feature.

He fought his way toward the light, dodging giant mutant bugs, deadly aliens creatures, and ancient evils from the Dark Ages—not knowing what he’d find when he got to the source, believing it had to be better than what he’d had.

—Alan M. Clark
Eugene, Oregon

If you like Alan M. Clark’s artwork, please try his writing in both short fiction and novels.

Artwork: “Holywood” copyright © 1991 Alan M. Clark. The image is inspired by a story concept by David Conover.

Captions are original to this post and have nothing to do with the literary project with which the artwork first appeared.

Dilation Exercise 96

Below you’ll find Alan M. Clark’s weekly Dilation Exercise. Please look at the picture, read the caption, above and below the image, and allow your imagination to go to work on it. If the artwork inspires an idea, please use the comment feature to tell us something about it. Need a further explanation? Go to Imagination Workout—The Dilation Exercises.

Alister had often wondered if the mechanics of his brain were responsible for making him like Harold or if the cruel man were indeed worthy of friendship.

But other than a best friend, Alister thought in the last moments of his life, who would do this for me?

Artwork: “The Long Walk” copyright © 1992 Alan M. Clark. Interior Illustration for Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine, appearing with “The Walk” by Greg Egan.

Captions are original to this post and have nothing to do with the literary project with which the artwork first appeared.

—Alan M. Clark
Eugene, Oregon

Dilation Exercise 95

Below you’ll find Alan M. Clark’s weekly Dilation Exercise. Please look at the picture, read the caption, above and below the image, and allow your imagination to go to work on it. If the artwork inspires an idea, please use the comment feature to tell us something about it. Need a further explanation? Go to Imagination Workout—The Dilation Exercises.

In 1957, when televisions could hardly maintain horizontal control, she was a sex kitten and he was an obese man who could no longer get around on his own.

So why did the network believe a reality TV show about the couple would sell?

Artwork: “Fat Man and Sex Kitten” copyright © 1985 Alan M. Clark.

Captions are original to this post and have nothing to do with the literary project with which the artwork first appeared.

—Alan M. Clark
Eugene, Oregon

Dilation Exercise 94

Below you’ll find Alan M. Clark’s weekly Dilation Exercise. Please look at the picture, read the caption, above and below the image, and allow your imagination to go to work on it. If the artwork inspires an idea, please use the comment feature to tell us something about it. Need a further explanation? Go to Imagination Workout—The Dilation Exercises.

Although the teams and the fans kept to all the colorful traditions, the game wasn’t what it used to be.

But, then, neither was reality.

Artwork: “The Campbell House” copyright © 1985 Alan M. Clark.
Interior illustration for Imagination Fully Dilated (inspired by the artwork, Peter Crowther wrote the story “The Space Between the Lines” for the anthology) edited by Elizabeth Engstrom and Alan M. Clark – Cemetery Dance Publications.

Captions are original to this post and have nothing to do with the literary project with which the artwork first appeared.

—Alan M. Clark
Eugene, Oregon

Dilation Exercise 80

Below you’ll find Alan M. Clark’s weekly Dilation Exercise. Please look at the picture, read the caption, above and below the image, and allow your imagination to go to work on it. If the artwork inspires an idea, please use the comment feature to tell us something about it. Need a further explanation? Go to Imagination Workout—The Dilation Exercises.

Alister married his dead half-sister, and their first night together was some weird kind of hell.

Despite her claim that they helped her to sleep, he thought her collection of stuffed animals was the most unusual he had ever seen.

Artwork: “The Mind Wanders” copyright © 1992 Alan M. Clark. Inspired by the painting, Gary A. Braunbeck wrote the story, “The Sisterhood of Plain-Faced Women.” The artwork first appeared as cover art for Gary A. Baunbeck’s collection,Things Left Behind, published by Cemetery Dance Publications, which included the story. The image appeared as an interior illustration along with the story in the anthology, IMAGINATION FULLY DILATED, VOLUME II, edited by Elizabeth Engstrom, published by IFD Publishing. The image also appears as an interior (appears in black & white) in SIREN PROMISED by Jeremy Robert Johnson and Alan M. Clark, published by Swallowdown Press.

Captions are original to this post and have nothing to do with the literary project with which the artwork first appeared.

—Alan M. Clark
Eugene, Oregon

Dilation Exercise 77

Below you’ll find Alan M. Clark’s weekly Dilation Exercise. Please look at the picture, read the caption, above and below the image, and allow your imagination to go to work on it. If the artwork inspires an idea, please use the comment feature to tell us something about it. Need a further explanation? Go to Imagination Workout—The Dilation Exercises.

At first the deformed pumpkins gathered only to defend one another against the children who would smash them.

But when one of the pumpkins was carved into a jack o’lantern, the misshapen gourds suddenly had a charismatic leader with a vision for their future, and thus began their scheming for world domination.

Artwork: “Orangefield” copyright © 2002 Alan M. Clark. Cover art for Orangefield, by Al Sarrantonio, published by Cemetery Dance Publications.

Captions are original to this post and have nothing to do with the literary project with which the artwork first appeared.

—Alan M. Clark
Eugene, Oregon

Dilation Exercise 76

Below you’ll find Alan M. Clark’s weekly Dilation Exercise. Please look at the picture, read the caption, above and below the image, and allow your imagination to go to work on it. If the artwork inspires an idea, please use the comment feature to tell us something about it. Need a further explanation? Go to Imagination Workout—The Dilation Exercises.

Hidden among the costumed children on Halloween night, he went from house to house, looking for the perfect party, one where he might bring the decorations to life, force the guests to carve “gourds” of his choosing or play his games, like Razor-Apple Bobbing and Touch the Parts of the Real Corpse.

His treats were the demented tricks he played on smug humans, and his delight at the way they went kicking and screaming to their demise was enough to keep him nourished until October of the next year.

Artwork: “Halloween Man” copyright © 1995 Alan M. Clark. Cover art for Night Shapes, by William F. Nolan, published by Cemetery Dance Publications.

Captions are original to this post and have nothing to do with the literary project with which the artwork first appeared.

—Alan M. Clark
Eugene, Oregon

Dilation Exercise 75

Below you’ll find Alan M. Clark’s weekly Dilation Exercise. Please look at the picture, read the caption, above and below the image, and allow your imagination to go to work on it. If the artwork inspires an idea, please use the comment feature to tell us something about it. Need a further explanation? Go to Imagination Workout—The Dilation Exercises.

The scarecrow got a new head every October, and with it came new thoughts and desires that lasted until the gourd rotted.

Usually these notions were harmless cravings for sweets and running free in the night unsupervised, but this year the boy who carved the head had been watching a horror movie while he worked, and that turned out to be pure inspiration for the scarecrow.

Artwork: “Hallows Eve” copyright © 2003 Alan M. Clark. Cover art for Hallows Eve, by Al Sarrantonio, published by Cemetery Dance Publications.

Captions are original to this post and have nothing to do with the literary project with which the artwork first appeared.

—Alan M. Clark
Eugene, Oregon

Dilation Exercise 66

Below you’ll find Alan M. Clark’s weekly Dilation Exercise. Please look at the picture, read the caption, above and below the image, and allow your imagination to go to work on it. If the artwork inspires an idea, please use the comment feature to tell us something about it. Need a further explanation? Go to Imagination Workout—The Dilation Exercises.

Several times he screwed up his courage to reach into the darkness for what he wanted, but his efforts were frustrated by the bars of iron.

Although desperately hungry, she was unwilling to reach through the bars of light for the child, and could only hope he would try again once the sun had set.

Artwork: “Out of the Darkness” copyright © 2006 Alan M. Clark. Cover for Vampyrrhic by Simon Clark, published by Cemetery Dance Publications.

Captions are original to this post and have nothing to do with the literary project with which the artwork first appeared.

—Alan M. Clark
Eugene, Oregon