Dilation Exercise 78

This week, my Dilation Exercise came about in an unusual way. I’ve been doing covers for P. A. Douglas, his novels released by Severed Press, Hitchers, The Dark Man, and Killer Koala Bears from Another Dimension. He recently hired me to come up with an image and two lines of text to go with it that would inspire his next novel. Basically, he wanted a Dilation Exercise. His only other instruction was that it be in the vein of the Cthulhu Mythos. I told him I’d do it if I could use the image and text as a Dilation Exercise here on my blog—see below. Visit P. A. Douglas’s Blog, Indie Inside, to read more about it.

Please look at the picture, read the caption, above and below the image, and allow your imagination to go to work on it. If the artwork inspires an idea, please use the comment feature to tell us something about it. Need a further explanation? Go to Imagination Workout—The Dilation Exercises. Oh, and by the way, Happy Halloween!

After an aeon of dreaming up mayhem for the sentient toys she so loved and hated, the Old One awoke with a roar, worried that she had pushed chaos too far.

Had her latest nightmare, a delightful excursion into a zombie apocalypse, destroyed all human beings or might she find enough survivors tucked away in defensible positions that her collection could be rebuilt and the games continue?

Artwork: “Her Broken Toys” copyright © 2012 Alan M. Clark. Cover art for an as yet untitled forthcoming novel by P. A. Douglas.

Captions are original to this post and may have nothing to do with the literary project with which the artwork will appear.

—Alan M. Clark
Eugene, Oregon

Dilation Exercise 76

Below you’ll find Alan M. Clark’s weekly Dilation Exercise. Please look at the picture, read the caption, above and below the image, and allow your imagination to go to work on it. If the artwork inspires an idea, please use the comment feature to tell us something about it. Need a further explanation? Go to Imagination Workout—The Dilation Exercises.

Hidden among the costumed children on Halloween night, he went from house to house, looking for the perfect party, one where he might bring the decorations to life, force the guests to carve “gourds” of his choosing or play his games, like Razor-Apple Bobbing and Touch the Parts of the Real Corpse.

His treats were the demented tricks he played on smug humans, and his delight at the way they went kicking and screaming to their demise was enough to keep him nourished until October of the next year.

Artwork: “Halloween Man” copyright © 1995 Alan M. Clark. Cover art for Night Shapes, by William F. Nolan, published by Cemetery Dance Publications.

Captions are original to this post and have nothing to do with the literary project with which the artwork first appeared.

—Alan M. Clark
Eugene, Oregon

Dilation Exercise 73

Below you’ll find Alan M. Clark’s weekly Dilation Exercise. Please look at the picture, read the caption, above and below the image, and allow your imagination to go to work on it. If the artwork inspires an idea, please use the comment feature to tell us something about it. Need a further explanation? Go to Imagination Workout—The Dilation Exercises.

The citizens of the city loved and hated the giant, suffering his dramatic moods along with him.

During his down time, the citizens left him to suffer for his excesses and took the opportunity to rebuild, but inevitably they became bored and looked forward with eagerness and dread to the time when he might rise up again.

Artwork: “Self Respect” copyright © 2005 Alan M. Clark. Cover concept for music CD, CURE FOR THE COMMON CATASTROPHE, by the band Pipers Stone.

Captions are original to this post and have nothing to do with the literary project with which the artwork first appeared.

—Alan M. Clark
Eugene, Oregon

Dilation 69

Below you’ll find Alan M. Clark’s weekly Dilation Exercise. Please look at the picture, read the caption, above and below the image, and allow your imagination to go to work on it. If the artwork inspires an idea, please use the comment feature to tell us something about it. Need a further explanation? Go to Imagination Workout—The Dilation Exercises.

Alister regretted his decision to turn his imagination into a laundry hamper since his socks were all stretched out of shape and growing insect elephant heads.

Still, he enjoyed reading the prehensile nasal passages while on the toilet, and because they were filled with mucus, they slipped onto his tiny feet more easily.

Artwork: “Hot Head Lends a Hand” copyright © 2008 Alan M. Clark and Steven C. Gilberts. Cover illustration for Lost in Cat Brain Land by Cameron Pierce, published by Eraserhead Press.

Captions are original to this post and have nothing to do with the literary project with which the artwork first appeared.

—Alan M. Clark
Eugene, Oregon

Dilation Exercise 52

Below you’ll find Alan M. Clark’s weekly Dilation Exercise. Please look at the picture, read the caption, above and below the image, and allow your imagination to go to work on it. If the artwork inspires a story, please say something about it in a comment. Need a further explanation? Go to Imagination Workout—The Dilation Exercises.

Saint %$&@#, the patron of free speech, had lain dormant for almost seventy years, her sleep made fitful only periodically by events among human kind.

Strange that in the information age she would awaken with a start and begin to struggle against her bonds.

Artwork: “Censorship” copyright © 2000 Alan M. Clark.
Interior illustration for “Pain and Other Petty Plots” by Alan M. Clark and Randy Fox, which appeared in Pain and Other Petty Plots to Keep You in Stitches – IFD Publishing.

Captions are original to this post and have nothing to do with the literary project with which the artwork first appeared.

—Alan M. Clark

Eugene, Oregon

Dilation Exercise 50

Below you’ll find Alan M. Clark’s weekly Dilation Exercise. Please look at the picture, read the caption, above and below the image, and allow your imagination to go to work on it. If the artwork inspires a story, please say something about it in a comment. Need a further explanation? Go to Imagination Workout—The Dilation Exercises.

Sold as a miracle cure for death itself, the dreaded mummified cat tea was said to work only if taken by a willing subject postmortem on Wednesday the 29th of February.

With Leap Year just around the corner, the product leapt off the shelves as countless people, wanting to thumb their noses at death, trusted the ad campaign and prepared to commit suicide.

Artwork: “Miracle Cure” copyright © 2004 Alan M. Clark.
Interior Illustration for DEAD CAT TRAVELING CIRCUS OF WONDERS AND MIRACLE MEDICINE SHOW, an anthology edited by Gerard Houarner and Gak. Published by Bedlam Press.

Captions are original to this post and have nothing to do with the literary project with which the artwork first appeared.

—Alan M. Clark

Eugene, Oregon

Dilation Exercise 48

Below you’ll find Alan M. Clark’s weekly Dilation Exercise. Please look at the picture, read the caption, above and below the image, and allow your imagination to go to work on it. If the artwork inspires a story, please say something about it in a comment. Need a further explanation? Go to Imagination Workout—The Dilation Exercises.

She was trouble, but I couldn’t stay away and I knew that one day temptation would get the better of me.

Noticing how frequently I cruised passed her corner, she knew it too, and she made special efforts to display her charms when I drove by.

Artwork: “With an Afterbirth Death Mint” copyright © 1989 Alan M. Clark.
David Conover wrote the story, “In Living Color (A Denouement),” based on the artwork. The image and story appeared in IMAGINATION FULLY DILATED, THE LITERARY WORKS OF ALAN M. CLARK, edited by Elizabeth Engstrom and Alan M. Clark, published by Cemetery Dance Publications.

Captions are original to this post and have nothing to do with the literary project with which the artwork first appeared.

—Alan M. Clark

Eugene, Oregon