Dilation Exercise 107

Below you’ll find Alan M. Clark’s weekly Dilation Exercise. Please look at the picture, read the caption, above and below the image, and allow your imagination to go to work on it. If the artwork inspires an idea, please use the comment feature to tell us something about it. Need a further explanation? Go to Imagination Workout—The Dilation Exercises.

The idea of shooting a flaming arrow into the heavens to rekindle the waning moon was considered a primitive one, not to be taken seriously by modern science

When confronted with the disaster of the the first manned mission to the moon, the Chief Scientist of NASA pointed out that the moon had not in fact caught fire.

—Alan M. Clark
Eugene, Oregon

If you like Alan M. Clark’s artwork, please try his writing in both short fiction and novels.

Artwork: “Flaming Arrows” copyright © 2000 Alan M. Clark. Cover illustration for Flaming Arrows by Bruce Holland Rogers – IFD Publishing.

Dilation Exercise 70

Below you’ll find Alan M. Clark’s weekly Dilation Exercise. Please look at the picture, read the caption, above and below the image, and allow your imagination to go to work on it. If the artwork inspires an idea, please use the comment feature to tell us something about it. Need a further explanation? Go to Imagination Workout—The Dilation Exercises.

After floating alone for so long through the dull, sleepless night of space, a terrible craving for attention led her to flirt with the landmasses below, kissing each in turn.

The slow continents grumbled and rumbled, jealously jockeying for position, but she would not stop herself even though she foresaw a horrific time when they would clash with one another in a great conflagration.

Artwork: “Lunar Kiss” copyright © 2006 Alan M. Clark. Cover illustration for Breath of the Moon by John Urbancik, published by Solitude Publications.

Captions are original to this post and have nothing to do with the literary project with which the artwork first appeared.

—Alan M. Clark
Eugene, Oregon