Dilation Exercise 105

Below you’ll find Alan M. Clark’s weekly Dilation Exercise. Please look at the picture, read the caption, above and below the image, and allow your imagination to go to work on it. If the artwork inspires an idea, please use the comment feature to tell us something about it. Need a further explanation? Go to Imagination Workout—The Dilation Exercises.

The operation was a simple ten minute procedure if the body occupying the slab was cold and disposable.

The staff had not had a “live one” to work on for some time, however, and they were determined to enjoy the warm flesh that had been offered.

—Alan M. Clark
Eugene, Oregon

If you like Alan M. Clark’s artwork, please try his writing in both short fiction and novels.

Artwork: Detail from “Chuckling Beneath His Mask” copyright © 1984 Alan M. Clark. Interior for The Pain Doctors of Suture self General by the Bovine Smoke Society (Alan M. Clark, Randy Fox, Jim Goad, Peteso, Thalia Ragsdale, Stephen C. Merritt, Cynthia Grissette Merritt, and Beth Gwinn) with an introduction by F. Paul Wilson, published by Arts Nova Press. The painting also appears in black and white as an interior illustration for Pain and Other Petty Plots to Keep You In Stitches by Alan M. Clark, Randy Fox, Troy Guinn, Mark Edwards and Jeremy Robert Johnson (introduction by F. Paul Wilson), published by IFD Publishing.

Dilation Exercise 103

Below you’ll find Alan M. Clark’s weekly Dilation Exercise. Please look at the picture, read the caption, above and below the image, and allow your imagination to go to work on it. If the artwork inspires an idea, please use the comment feature to tell us something about it. Need a further explanation? Go to Imagination Workout—The Dilation Exercises.

Pricilla’s father saw himself as a macho ranch-hand and was insecure without the trappings of his vocation.


Unaware of her hydrocephalic condition as she prepared for her dance recital, she placed his hat upon her head as a lark, and the mistake almost cost Pricilla her life.

—Alan M. Clark
Eugene, Oregon

If you like Alan M. Clark’s artwork, please try his writing in both short fiction and novels.

Artwork: “Screaming Handful’” copyright © 1980 Alan M. Clark. Unpublished.

Dilation Exercise 101

Below you’ll find Alan M. Clark’s weekly Dilation Exercise. Please look at the picture, read the caption, above and below the image, and allow your imagination to go to work on it. Need a further explanation? Go to Imagination Workout—The Dilation Exercises.

Bill Toby Gerbil marries a can of fresh worms.


Bride was lost in a fishing accident only days later.

About the photo and caption:
In the 1980s, before digital photography was available, I used a polaroid camera to get instant pictures for reference photos for my illustrations. The photos were terrible, like the one in this post. My good friend, Jack Daves, who unfortunately passed away in 2004, liked my photos because they made him laugh. He was a very funny fellow, a great horror writer, and a wonderful musician who helped create the band, The Secret Commonwealth. Jack liked captioning my reference photos. The one I share today is my favorite – written by Jack Hunter Daves. He still makes me laugh.

—Alan M. Clark
Eugene, Oregon

 

Dilation Exercise 100

Below you’ll find Alan M. Clark’s weekly Dilation Exercise. Please look at the picture, read the caption, above and below the image, and allow your imagination to go to work on it. If the artwork inspires an idea, please use the comment feature to tell us something about it. Need a further explanation? Go to Imagination Workout—The Dilation Exercises.

He hated his older sister when she stole his candy bar, but then when she began to choke on it, he panicked for fear of losing one he truly loved.


Although he began beating her chest to clear her obstructed airway, it felt so good to punish her, he just kept at it.

—Alan M. Clark
Eugene, Oregon

If you like Alan M. Clark’s artwork, please try his writing in both short fiction and novels.

Artwork: “Dead Little Girl” copyright © 2011 Alan M. Clark. Interior illustration for Flesh and Blood 13, appearing with the story, “Who Killed Little Betty,” by Brian Knight.

Captions are original to this post and have nothing to do with the literary project with which the artwork first appeared.

Dilation Exercise 99

Below you’ll find Alan M. Clark’s weekly Dilation Exercise. Please look at the picture, read the caption, above and below the image, and allow your imagination to go to work on it. If the artwork inspires an idea, please use the comment feature to tell us something about it. Need a further explanation? Go to Imagination Workout—The Dilation Exercises.

In the midst of the great struggle for the soul of mankind, the revelation of the great wobbly breasts of Cartoon Pope was so startling for Evil Crabman that it nearly took the fight out of him.

Then, imagine his surprise when the pontiff asked for a hug.

—Alan M. Clark
Eugene, Oregon

If you like Alan M. Clark’s artwork, please try his writing in both short fiction and novels.

Artwork: “Cartoon Pope” copyright © 2011 Alan M. Clark. A controlled accident painting created during a controlled accident workshop Mr. Clark taught at the Emerald Art Center in Springfield, Oregon.

Dilation Exercise 98

Below you’ll find Alan M. Clark’s weekly Dilation Exercise. Please look at the picture, read the caption, above and below the image, and allow your imagination to go to work on it. If the artwork inspires an idea, please use the comment feature to tell us something about it. Need a further explanation? Go to Imagination Workout—The Dilation Exercises.

The boy had no close friends, his parents didn’t understand him, and he loved nothing in the world so much as monster movies; so, he fled reality, entering the television one afternoon during his favorite show, The Horror Feature.

He fought his way toward the light, dodging giant mutant bugs, deadly aliens creatures, and ancient evils from the Dark Ages—not knowing what he’d find when he got to the source, believing it had to be better than what he’d had.

—Alan M. Clark
Eugene, Oregon

If you like Alan M. Clark’s artwork, please try his writing in both short fiction and novels.

Artwork: “Holywood” copyright © 1991 Alan M. Clark. The image is inspired by a story concept by David Conover.

Captions are original to this post and have nothing to do with the literary project with which the artwork first appeared.

Dilation Exercise 96

Below you’ll find Alan M. Clark’s weekly Dilation Exercise. Please look at the picture, read the caption, above and below the image, and allow your imagination to go to work on it. If the artwork inspires an idea, please use the comment feature to tell us something about it. Need a further explanation? Go to Imagination Workout—The Dilation Exercises.

Alister had often wondered if the mechanics of his brain were responsible for making him like Harold or if the cruel man were indeed worthy of friendship.

But other than a best friend, Alister thought in the last moments of his life, who would do this for me?

Artwork: “The Long Walk” copyright © 1992 Alan M. Clark. Interior Illustration for Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine, appearing with “The Walk” by Greg Egan.

Captions are original to this post and have nothing to do with the literary project with which the artwork first appeared.

—Alan M. Clark
Eugene, Oregon

Dilation Exercise 95

Below you’ll find Alan M. Clark’s weekly Dilation Exercise. Please look at the picture, read the caption, above and below the image, and allow your imagination to go to work on it. If the artwork inspires an idea, please use the comment feature to tell us something about it. Need a further explanation? Go to Imagination Workout—The Dilation Exercises.

In 1957, when televisions could hardly maintain horizontal control, she was a sex kitten and he was an obese man who could no longer get around on his own.

So why did the network believe a reality TV show about the couple would sell?

Artwork: “Fat Man and Sex Kitten” copyright © 1985 Alan M. Clark.

Captions are original to this post and have nothing to do with the literary project with which the artwork first appeared.

—Alan M. Clark
Eugene, Oregon

Dilation Exercise 94

Below you’ll find Alan M. Clark’s weekly Dilation Exercise. Please look at the picture, read the caption, above and below the image, and allow your imagination to go to work on it. If the artwork inspires an idea, please use the comment feature to tell us something about it. Need a further explanation? Go to Imagination Workout—The Dilation Exercises.

Although the teams and the fans kept to all the colorful traditions, the game wasn’t what it used to be.

But, then, neither was reality.

Artwork: “The Campbell House” copyright © 1985 Alan M. Clark.
Interior illustration for Imagination Fully Dilated (inspired by the artwork, Peter Crowther wrote the story “The Space Between the Lines” for the anthology) edited by Elizabeth Engstrom and Alan M. Clark – Cemetery Dance Publications.

Captions are original to this post and have nothing to do with the literary project with which the artwork first appeared.

—Alan M. Clark
Eugene, Oregon

Art from Pure Imagination—Inventing Light and Shadow

When inventing subject matter without the aid of reference images in drawing and painting, there are a few assumptions based on my observations of the real world that I find useful.

1) All light travels in a straight line until it reaches an object, at which point it is reflected, frequently in a radiating manner, the directions of the reflection being determined by the shape of the object.
2) Ambient light is that which comes from reflection. All objects within an environment reflect light, including the particles of gas within the negative space. These reflections bounce all over the place, further illuminating everything within an environment. The more the light bounces, however, the less powerful is its ability to illuminate as it becomes scattered and diffuse.
3) Direct light is that which is reflected off objects directly from a light source within an environment.
4) Shadows occur where light, both direct and ambient have a hard time reaching. Shadows vary in darkness, depending on how close they are to that which casts them. The darkest shadows occur where the influence of ambient light is diminished by how many times it must bounce to reach the area. The farther away shadows occur from the object which casts them, the subtler they are due to the influence of ambient light.

Artwork: “If You Have Any Worth at All” copyright © 1994 Alan M. Clark

—Alan M. Clark
Eugene, Oregon